Free Pattern of the Month

Timid Tom Turkey - Free pattern part 1

Wednesday, October 23, 2019

Joining the Local Quilt Quild

It's terrifying actually.

Entering a room with 100 quilters you don't know.

Then seeing the fabulous quilts they've produced.

It's terrifying!

In July of this year my sister, Laura, and I put crowbars in our wallets and gave up the $15 it cost to join the local quilt guild.

The July event was a workshop with amazing instructors, fabulous quilts, and all kinds of gadgets and other ephemera to buy.

Laura bought some patterns at the yard sale.

I came home with a brand new, still had the oxygen pack inside, carry-on type rolling tote in a giraffe pattern. It was $3.

I also scored some nifty quilt books, a couple patterns that I will probably never make, and a few yards of super cute novelty fabric.

I think if we pooled our spending it set us back around $10. We had a great time.

Today we went to our 2nd guild meeting.

I got brave and brought some of my Seamless Piecing items for Show and Tell. 
If you are here from the Guild... Welcome! Please say hello in the  comment section below.
 Here are a few of the Seamless Piecing projects I show and tell-ed.

Witches Pickets
Hexis Gone Wild

On a Summer Afternoon



Then there was the class presentation. 

All around the large room hung prize winning quilts made by guild members. They were all examples of nifty borders and/or bindings.

I'm a minimalist quilter.

Because I'm not a pro at the quilting machine, I kinda quilt enough to keep the quilt together but not enough to actually have my quilting be part of the design. 



After I'd done my thing at the meeting, I was able to relax and look around.

Oh. My. Hunnies!

I felt more than just a little overwhelmed at the amazing art all around me. For a minute I felt silly for being so willing to show off my meager offerings.


Here's a sampling of what others in the guild brought to show.



























 
  Here's what I want everyone to know.



I love that other people make fabulous quilts that knock your socks off and win show ribbons.


I love that these inspiring artist are willing to bring these magnificent treasures into public and to show them to the plebeian likes of me.



I love seeing the quilts.

I love touching the quilts (shhhh! don't tell).





And I really love seeing what I can aspire to with my limited skills.






(Hand crocheted lace prairie points with beaded binding, anyone?)


But here's the thing...

I don't make those kinds of quilts.

And I'm ok with that.

Why don't I make fabulous quilts and why do I think it's ok?

Three Reasons:
  1. We all start somewhere.
  2. My quilts make me happy, even if they don't win prizes.
  3. It's ok to have my own style, it's what makes me unique, just like everyone else.  ;-]
Would I like to make an award winning quilt?

I don't know the answer to that.

Maybe someday I'll enter something somewhere. But you can be sure it won't be made of 1/2" log cabin strips. I enjoy admiring the painstaking work of others. But I have no patience for that in my own work.

Right now I'm in a happy place making what I enjoy and sharing that with you.

Thanks for coming along on the ride.


Don't forget to share a link to the blog and invite your friends to feed their inner quilter.


Follow the blog by clicking the Followers box in the right sidebar.


Please leave comments below or photos on Facebook and follow us on Pinterest.


See you next time!

RaeLyn
RB

PS. Wanna see where I hang out when I'm not at Seamless Piecing?

The Quilt Pattern Magazine is an online, monthly magazine where I publish some of my designs.
AND... it's not just a magazine. It's also a delightful, private, online community called Pattern Pastiche. Some of the best and nicest quilters around hang out there along with others, like me, who just want to rub shoulders with them.

It's a safe place to ask questions and get mentoring from those who know and care.
AND... If you go there from here you can use a special discount code just for Seamless Piecing readers. Here's the link. The code is: SP

What's up at TQPM?


The You Choose adventure continues at Pattern Pastiche. It's a FREE event. You just have to stop by during Live Chat times to get your clues.Come find out what your clue is. It probably won't be the same as mine.

I made this strippy quilt top for QuiltsforKidsslc.org to fill my clue #2.








Three new groups have started at TQPM.

Introductions and parts 1 of the patterns are published in the October 2019 issue of The Quilt Pattern Magazine.



Kaliedescope Flake is an English Paper Piecing design by Cindy McCoy. If you've never done EPP it's time you learn. It's a perfect take-along project. Cindy is a fabulous EPP designer and will gladly help you learn this skill.
Runs October 2019 through April 2020.







Floral Spin is a mystery quilt designed by Bonny Peters of CatDenMountainQuilts.com. Bonny's designs are always fresh and fun. She has an amazing eye for color and she's a great teacher. If you are looking for a mystery you know is going to end up looking awesome, this may be the one for you.
Runs October 2019 through February 2020.





Nancy Noah designed the Harlequin quilt as part of an Ostrich Round Robin group at TQPM last year. It turned out really great and is now offered in the magazine as a Block of the Month. The monthly installments aren't actually blocks, they are each unique borders on this beautiful Queen size quilt.
Runs October 2019 through March 2020.

The October issue is still available with your subscription through November 30.

2 comments:

  1. Hi RaeLyn,
    You just perfectly described my own experience at joining a quilt guild this past spring, what I think about my own meager quilting skills compared to what the others have to show, and how I feel about my style of quilting. "I don't make those kinds of quilts. And I'm ok with that." Exactly! Thank you for validating my feelings, and letting me know that I'm not the only one out here like that. Great blog post!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks for your comment Kathryn. We're not alone. I'm sure we are part of the silent majority.

    ReplyDelete

You might also enjoy: